Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Board 87

Board 87
Both sides vulnerable

♠ K J 3 4 A Q J 7 6 3 ♣ 9 5 2

I open one diamond in first seat. Partner responds one heart, and RHO doubles. I bid two diamonds. This is passed around to RHO, who bids three clubs. I pass, as do LHO and partner.

I don't care much for the singleton heart lead. Who's to say partner can get in to give me a ruff? Even if he can, we may just be trading natural heart tricks for ruffs. Declarer seems to have a pretty good hand, so dummy may be short of entries and a heart lead may benefit his side more than our side. We seem to have the side suits pretty well bottled up. I have spades and diamonds, and partner has hearts. Often a trump lead is best in that scenario, so I lead the five of clubs. (This argument is more pithily stated in Lowenthal's Third Law of Opening Leads: The lead of a trump shows a side singleton or void.)


NORTH
♠ 8 5 2
9 8 5 3
K 8 4
♣ Q 6 3


WEST
♠ K J 3
4
A Q J 7 6 3
♣ 9 5 2




West
North
East
South
1
Pass
1
Double
2
Pass
Pass
3 ♣
(All pass)


Declarer plays the three from dummy, partner wins with the ace, and declarer drops the four. I guess partner did have an entry with which to give me a heart ruff, but it's still not clear it would have gained a trick. Partner goes along with my idea and continues with the eight of clubs. Declarer wins in his hand with the jack and leads the five of diamonds. I hop with the ace and partner plays the deuce. Surely partner doesn't have three diamonds. He wouldn't sell out to three clubs if he knew we had a nine-card fit. I assume he has ten doubleton and is reluctant to waste the ten.

I see nothing constructive to do. If partner has the ace of hearts in addition to my two spade tricks, declarer is going down, so there is no reason for a belated attempt to score a heart ruff. I might as well just exit with my last club and hope that refusing to break hearts for declarer was the right idea.

I play a club to dummy's queen, and partner plays the nine of diamonds. I suppose he's following the rule of playing the card you can't possibly hold. Declarer plays the king of diamonds, partner plays the ten, and declarer pitches the four of spades. Declarer wouldn't be pitching a spade unless he were 3-4-1-5. So to beat this we need to take two heart tricks.

Declarer plays the three of hearts--seven--jack--four. I hope that means he has ace-queen-jack-small. No, he can't have that. The heart finesse would do him no good with that holding, since he can't repeat it. His correctly play in hearts would be to try to drop the singleton king in my hand, so he would use his one dummy entry to take a spade finesse. He must have ace-king-jack-small, which means we're not beating this. My construction is correct. We take one heart and one spade, holding three clubs to three.


NORTH
♠ 8 5 2
9 8 5 3
K 8 4
♣ Q 6 3


WEST
♠ K J 3
4
A Q J 7 6 3
♣ 9 5 2


EAST
♠ 10 9 7 6
Q 10 7 2
10 9 2
♣ A 8


SOUTH
♠ A Q 4
A K J 6
5
♣ K J 10 7 4



Why, partner, why? That's what happens when you break the Law. We go minus 110 when we should be plus 110.

At the other table, the auction is the same. West leads his singleton heart. He gets his heart ruff, but loses his natural heart trick. Making three for a push.  This should have been a routine 6-imp pickup.

Me: -110
Jack: -110

Score on Board 87: 0 IMPs
Total: -101 IMPs

3 comments:

  1. Not clear to me you are going to make 3D. Not saying you shouldn't be there but how do you play on Club Club?

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  2. I guess I would float the ten of diamonds. If West wins this, he can't beat me. If he ducks, I must admit I would probably go down. I considered adjudicating partner's charge down to 3 imps, but I decided to find out what actually would have happened. I reloaded the deal and declared three diamonds against Jack. He didn't duck, so the 6-imp charge stands. On second thought, I'm upping it to 7: 6 imps actual damages, and 1 imp punitive damages, just for breaking the Law.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Next match you will draw tuffer opponents!

    ReplyDelete